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Signs that Some Children Need Stronger Supervision around Pools

Children at pool

There isn't a better safety precaution for children playing in pools than supervision. Supervision is an essential part of water safety. Whether you're in the backyard enjoying your own private pool or you're at a public facility where lifeguards are present, supervision is a must.

Naturally young children require a lot more supervision than teenagers. This is especially true if they are still learning how to swim or aren't strong swimmers. Any use of the dog paddle should indicate that additional supervision is needed. Regardless if you're a lifeguard or simply a concerned parent, young children around the pool is one of the clearest signs that stronger supervision is required. Kids typically have a tendency to escape parental supervision and sometimes a few seconds can make all the difference when an accident occurs around a pool.

Some children are quite calm in pools and generally stick to one area of the pool. However some are more fearless and constantly want to jump or dive into the pool. Others may be a little rougher when playing with others and you consistently need to remind them to play without hurting others. These are additional signs of children requiring extra supervision.

Tips for Supervision and Injury Prevention

Supervision is one of the biggest concerns for Jeff Ellis Management. The reason why is that supervision reduces the risk of injuries. If you are able to maintain pool safety rules and make sure kids are playing in a safe manner, injuries are naturally less likely to happen. The goal of implementing good supervision is to stop potential injuries from ever occurring.

Keep the following tips in mind when it’s your turn to supervise children around the pool:

  • Remind children of pool safety rules
  • Avoid reading or socializing with other adults
  • Don't solely rely on lifeguards to watch your kids
  • Have a good understanding of first aid and CPR
  • Get in a position where you can see the entire pool and all of the kids
  • Consistently scan the pool and take a head count so you can quickly see everyone is safe

These supervision tips should serve as a friendly reminder that you can never be too safe around pools. A serious injury or even drowning accident can take place during the time it takes to answer the phone. The next time you are in charge of watching children at the pool, pay close attention to any signs that may lead to injury or accident.